Policy Press

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Comedy and critique

Stand-up comedy and the professional ethos of laughter

Published

20 Jun 2018

Page count

156 pages

ISBN

978-1529200157

Dimensions

198 x 129 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£45.00 £36.00You save £9.00 (20%) Add to basket

Published

20 Jun 2018

Page count

156 pages

ISBN

978-1529200171

Dimensions

198 x 129 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£8.99 £7.19You save £1.80 (20%)
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  • Published

    20 Jun 2018

    Page count

    156 pages

    ISBN

    978-1529200188

    Dimensions

    198 x 129 mm

    Imprint

    Bristol University Press
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    Comedy and Critique explores British professional stand-up comedy in the wake of the Alternative Comedy movement of the late twentieth century, seeing it as an extension of the politics of the New Left: standing up for oneself as anti-racist, feminist and open to a queering of self and social institutions.

    Daniel Smith demonstrates that the comic sensibility pervading contemporary humour is as much ‘speaking truth to power’ as it is realising one’s position ‘in’ power. The professionalisation of New Left humour offers a challenge to social and cultural critique. Stand-up comedy has made us all sociologists of self, identity and cultural power while also resigning us to a place where a comic sensibility becomes an acknowledgment of the necessity of social change.

    Dr. Daniel R. Smith is Senior Lecturer in Sociology at Anglia Ruskin University. His research interests are in the sociology of class and culture, identity and popular culture as well as social media and celebrity. Along with Comedy & Critique, he is the author of Elites, Race and Nationhood: The Branded Gentry.

    Introduction;

    I: Analytical Part;

    The Art of Stand-up Comedy;

    The Professionalization of Stand-up Comedy;

    II: Synthetic Part;

    Representation;

    Persona;

    III: Critical Part;

    The Critique of Comic Reason.

    "Provides a stimulating account of the way in which stand-up comedians respond to their sociological contexts and offers valuable insights into how comedians ‘do’ sociology." Sophie Quirk, University of Kent