Policy Press

Publishing with a Purpose

The social context of outsourced domestic cleaning

Published

1 Dec 2018

Page count

216 pages

Series

Gender and Sociology

ISBN

978-1529201468

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£75.00 £60.00You save £15.00 (20%) Pre-order

Published

1 Dec 2018

Page count

216 pages

Series

Gender and Sociology

ISBN

978-1529201499

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£26.99 £21.59You save £5.40 (20%)

Published

1 Dec 2018

Page count

216 pages

Series

Gender and Sociology

ISBN

978-1529201482

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£26.99 £21.59You save £5.40 (20%)
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    Outsourcing of domestic work in the UK has been steadily rising since the 1970s, but little research has considered White British women working as independent cleaning service-providers. Recent work primarily focuses on migrant workers, particularly in London, a region unrepresentative of the wider United Kingdom.

    Based on new research in two countries (UK and India) this book argues that outsourced domestic cleaning can either be done as mental and manual skilled work or as manual and ‘natural’ emotional/affective labour, depending on the work conditions.

    This nuanced cross-cultural analysis of outsourced domestic cleaning offers a fresh perspective on domestic work, as well as its relationship with feminism and the wider field of work by challenging feminist dogmas and popular myths about housework.

    Lotika Singha received her doctorate in women’s studies from the University of York. Her research interests centre on social inequalities in everyday life and cross-cultural theories across various population groups.

    Introduction;

    Feminist approaches to paid domestic work: a critique;

    Demographic considerations in outsourced domestic cleaning in the study areas;

    The politics of outsourcing cleaning in (middle-class) households;

    The imperfect contours of paid domestic work as dirty work;

    Domestic cleaning: work or labour?;

    Meanings of domestic cleaning as work and as labour;

    Cultural injustices in the occupational relations of domestic cleaning as work and as labour;

    Conclusion: the case for reconciliation;

    Appendices.