Policy Press

Publishing with a Purpose

General non-fiction

We publish serious non-fiction social commentary and debate for a wide audience. These high quality books are written by academics, professionals and other experts in an accessible way bringing key issues of social, political and cultural significance to a wide readership. These books have an impact: advancing knowledge, raising awareness and encouraging social change.

 

Showing 1-12 of 91 items.

The Economics of Arrival

Ideas for a grown-up economy

The richest countries already have plenty of wealth and resources – they have ‘arrived’. But they could make it impossible for people elsewhere to escape poverty. Trebeck and Williams describe a move from expansion to inclusion. Using global examples, they argue for an economy that delivers quality rather than quantity: an economy for everyone.

What’s wrong with work?

What’s wrong with work shows that how workers are treated has wide implications beyond the lives of workers themselves.

Recognising gender, race, class and global differences, the book considers the ways formal work is often dependent on informal work and concludes by considering what might make work better.

The class ceiling

Why it pays to be privileged

Official Secrets

Child sex abuse from Cleveland to Savile

Official Secrets reveals that the enquiry that followed the Cleveland child abuse scandal of 1987 was a cover-up. Doctors were discouraged and social workers disempowered - a legacy that leads all the way to the current Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse.

Invisible Britain

Portraits of hope and resistance

Edited by Paul Sng

From cities, towns and rural areas across Britain, 40 diverse stories of hope and hopelessness will be told from within a changing society in which many feel misrepresented in the media and out of sync with the government and politicians.

The lies we were told

Five years of austerity and brexit politics as it happened

Simon Wren-Lewis' widely-read Mainly Macro blog is an influential resource for policymakers, academics and social commentators. This book tells how damaging political and economic events of recent years became inevitable and serves as a warning to avert future disasters on this scale.

In whose interest?

The Privatisation of Child Protection and Social Work

What is the social cost of privatising public services? And what effect has the failure of previous privatisations had? This book tells how social work services are now being out-sourced to private companies and how this trend threatens the safety and wellbeing of vulnerable children and disabled adults.

Snobbery

Snobbery matters because it is the way in which social divisions are built. In these times of growing social inequality, snobbery is becoming ever more pertinent. This book draws on literature, popular culture and autobiography as well as sociology and history to take a fresh and engaging look at this key social and cultural issue.

Who are universities for?

Re-making higher education

Who are universities for? argues for a large-scale shake up of how we organise higher education. It includes radical proposals for reform of the curriculum and how we admit students to higher education. Offering concrete solutions, it provides a way forward for universities to become more responsive to challenges.

Peak Inequality

Britain's ticking time bomb

Dorling brings together new material alongside a selection of his most recent writing on inequality from publications including the Daily Telegraph, the Guardian, New Statesman, Financial Times and the China People’s Daily. He explores whether we have now reached ‘peak inequality’ and concludes by predicting what the future holds for Britain.

The Right Amount of Panic

How women trade freedom for safety

With real-life accounts of women’s experiences, and based on the author’s original research, this book challenges the culture of victim-blaming and shows how much energy women put into avoiding sexual violence in public spaces.

Law and society in a populist age

Balancing individual rights and the common good

Amitai Etzioni argues for a new liberal communitarian approach as an effective response to populism. The book considers national security versus privacy, private sector responsibility, freedom of the press, campaign finance reform, regulatory law and the legal status of terrorists, offering a timely discussion of key issues.