Kitty Stewart

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Social Policy in a Cold Climate

Policies and their Consequences since the Crisis

A data-rich, evidence-based analysis of the impact Labour and coalition government policies following the financial crisis, with particular focus on poverty and inequality, by leading policy experts from the LSE, and Universities of Manchester and York.

Policy Press

An Equal Start?

Providing Quality Early Education and Care for Disadvantaged Children

In this book, leading experts examine how early education and care is organised and funded in eight different countries. Bringing together recent evidence, the book provides rich insights on how policies work in practice, and the extent to which they help or hinder the provision of high quality education and care.

Policy Press

Towards a more equal society?

Poverty, inequality and policy since 1997

As New Labour approaches the end of an unprecedented third term in office, this bestselling book asks whether Britain is more equal than it was in 1997. This second volume, following on from the highly successful "A more equal society?", provides an independent assessment of the success or otherwise of New Labour's policies. 

Policy Press

A more equal society?

New Labour, poverty, inequality and exclusion

This major new book provides, for the first time, a detailed evaluation of policies on poverty and social exclusion since 1997, and their effects. Bringing together leading experts in the field, it considers the challenges the government has faced, the policies chosen and the targets set in order to assess results.

Policy Press

The welfare of Europe's children

Are EU member states converging?

This ground-breaking book analyses the living standards of nearly 80 million children in the EU. It considers whether the well-being of children is becoming more similar across member states or if the countries are diverging while their economies converge. It provides a wealth of evidence not previously drawn together in a single source.

Policy Press