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Studies in Social Harm

Series Editors: Christina Pantazis, University of Bristol, UK, Simon Pemberton, University of Birmingham, UK and Steve Tombs, The Open University

“This series considers what matters most. Our value system is out of kilter. We imprison people, mostly the poorest, often for committing minor crimes, including not being able to pay back debts. We frequently laud those who can commit the most harm as wealth creators. Now is the right time for a focus on who is harmed most, how and why.” Danny Dorling, University of Oxford

Social harm is an emerging field of study which contributes to contemporary social and political debate. This exciting series moves the debate towards a holistic approach that seeks to understand the production of harm within contemporary society. The topical inter-disciplinary series offers comparative and international perspectives to understand the distribution of harm and combines new theory and empirical research.

Download the series flyer here.

Contact regarding proposals

If you would like to submit a proposal, or discuss ideas, then please contact the Series Editors:
Christina Pantazis, c.pantazis@bristol.ac.uk
Simon Pemberton, s.pemberton.1@bham.ac.uk
Steve Tombs, steve.tombs@open.ac.uk
Rebecca Tomlinson, Rebecca.Tomlinson@bristol.ac.uk (Commissioning Editor for Criminology, Bristol University Press)

Editorial advisory board

Lois Bibbings, University of Bristol, UK
Danny Dorling, University of Oxford, UK
Geetangoli Gangoli, University of Durham, UK
Barry Glassner, Lewis and Clark College, US
Paddy Hillyard, Queen’s University Belfast, UK
James Nazroo, University of Manchester, UK
Marty Schwartz, University of Ohio, US
Rob White, University of Tasmania, Australia
Ifeanyi Ezeonu, Brock University, Canada
Lois Presser, University of Tennessee, US
Hanna Malik, University of Turku, Finland
Elizabeth Stanley, University of Wellington, New Zealand
Chris Grover, University of Lancaster, UK
Rowland Atkinson, University of Sheffield, UK
Dylan Kerrigan, University of the West Indies/Univerity of Leicester

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Showing 1-5 of 5 items.

Against Youth Violence

A Social Harm Perspective

Youth violence dominates headlines and politicians’ attention and many organisations invest considerable resources in an attempt to reduce it. This book examines how inequality and social harms drive such violence and highlights key future goals for policymakers, researchers and practitioners.

Bristol Uni Press

Environmental Harm

An Eco-Justice Perspective

A systematic and critical discussion of the nature of environmental harm from an eco-justice perspective, challenging conventional criminological definitions of environmental harm. It features examples and illustrations from many national contexts.

Policy Press

Harmful Societies

Understanding Social Harm

This book is the first to theorise and define the social harm concept beyond criminology and seeks to address these omissions and in doing so provide a platform for future debates, in this series and beyond.

Policy Press

The Harms of Work

An Ultra-Realist Account of the Service Economy

This book discusses workplace harm through an ultra-realist lens and examines the connection between individuals, their working conditions and management culture. It investigates the reorganisation of labour markets and the shift to flexibility and highlights working conditions and organisational practices within which multiple harms occur.

Bristol Uni Press

Labour Exploitation and Work-Based Harm

EPUB and EPDF available Open Access under CC-BY-NC-ND licence. This book provides a critical understanding of contemporary forced labour as a global social problem and argues that it should be located within the broader study of work-based harm.

Policy Press