Policy Press

Publishing with a Purpose

English universities in crisis

Markets without competition

Published

30 Jan 2019

Page count

144 pages

ISBN

978-1529202250

Dimensions

216 x 138 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£12.99 £10.39You save £2.60 (20%) Pre-order

Published

30 Jan 2019

Page count

144 pages

ISBN

978-1529202281

Dimensions

216 x 138 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£10.99 £8.80You save £2.19 (20%)

Published

30 Jan 2019

Page count

144 pages

ISBN

978-1529202267

Dimensions

216 x 138 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£10.99 £8.80You save £2.19 (20%)
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    Recent policies have replaced direct government funding for teaching with fees paid by students. As well as saddling graduates with enormous debt, satisfaction rates are low, a high proportion of graduates are in non-graduate jobs, and public debt from unpaid loans is rocketing.

    This timely and challenging analysis combines theoretical and data analysis and insights gained from running a university, to give robust new policy proposals: lower fees; reintroduce maintenance awards; impose student number caps; maintain taxpayer funding; cancel the TEF; re-build the external examiner system; restructure the contingent-repayment loan scheme; and establish different roles for different types of institutions, to encourage excellence and ultimately benefit society.

    Jefferson Frank was founding head of the Economics Department at Royal Holloway. Trained as a macroeconomist, Jeff has also extensively investigated the gender pay gap, BME and LGBTQ discrimination, inequality in the university sector, and the current funding and fees crisis. He is the author of The Responsible Economy (Routledge, 2014) and a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences.

    Norman Gowar, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at the University of London, is a former Principal of Royal Holloway. He presented the first lecture ever to be broadcast by the Open University. He co-founded the Office of the Independent Adjudicator for Student Complaints and was its first Chairman.

    Michael Naef is Reader in Economics at Royal Holloway. He works in experimental economics using weird and wonderful substances (testosterone, estrogen, sulpiride) to see what happens. He has published widely, including in Nature and the American Economic Review.

    Introduction

    How Did We Get Here?

    A Short Note On: The Case for Free Tuition and the Scottish Approach

    Markets Without Competition

    Stakeholders and Expenditures

    Expanding Numbers and Maintaining Standards

    A Short Note On: Setting up the OIA

    Widening Participation and Student Finance

    A Short Note On: The Open University

    A Short Note On: The Case for Career Colleges: The US Model, by Lincoln E. Frank

    Adjusting to the Future

    "Convincingly undermines the rationale for the funding regime for English higher education established since 2010 - and it does so strictly on the government’s own terms." Peter Scott, Institute of Education, UCL

    “An extremely topical up-to-date analysis of recent Government policies and their effect on the public purse, student finance, student behaviour, the university system and the internal management of universities.. will be invaluable for a wide group of readers, from higher education employees and staff to policy makers, the media and students.” Dame Hon Margaret Hodge MP

    "Excellent analysis of how UK university reforms since 2012 have proved dysfunctional because they created too little, not too much, competition, and allowed university managements to divert most of the extra fee funding to their own ends. It offers solutions from the insights of two economists and a former VC." Peter Holmes, University of Sussex