Policy Press

Publishing with Purpose

A Child’s Day

A Comprehensive Analysis of Change in Children’s Time Use in the UK

By Killian Mullan

Published

16 Jul 2020

Page count

212 pages

Series

Sociology of Children and Families

ISBN

978-1529201697

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press

Published

16 Jul 2020

Page count

212 pages

Series

Sociology of Children and Families

ISBN

978-1529201727

Dimensions

Imprint

Bristol University Press

Published

16 Jul 2020

Page count

212 pages

Series

Sociology of Children and Families

ISBN

978-1529201727

Dimensions

Imprint

Bristol University Press
A Child’s Day

In the media

On our blog: A child’s day in the new normal

We routinely judge how well children are doing in their lives by how they spend their time, yet we know remarkably little about it.

This rigorous review of four decades of data provides the clearest insights yet into the way children use their time. With analysis of changes in the time spent on family, education, culture and technology, as well as children’s own views on their habits, it provides a fascinating perspective on behaviour, wellbeing, social change and more.

This is an indispensable companion to the work of policy makers, academics and researchers, and anyone interested in the daily lives of children.

"A must-read empirical piece for anyone who wants to understand child well-being from the perspective of children’s time use in their everyday lives." Antonia Keung, University of York

“We adults judge how our children spend their time based on our own childhood. Yet childhood changed and it is consistently changing. The book before you is a very successful attempt to tackle this issue.’’ Asher Ben Arieh, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

"Children’s time use is much discussed, but surprisingly little-studied. This ground-breaking book fills this evidence gap, offering important new insights into UK children’s daily life over the last forty years." Lyn Craig, University of Melbourne

Killian Mullan is a lecturer in sociology and policy at Aston University, Birmingham. His work focuses on children and young people’s time use in cross-national and longitudinal perspectives.

Introduction

Time for Education and Culture

Time for Health

Time for Family

Time for Technology

How Children Feel About How They Spend Time

Conclusion