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A Criminology of Moral Order

By Hans Boutellier

Published

16 Jan 2019

Page count

176 pages

Series

New Horizons in Criminology

ISBN

978-1529203752

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£60.00 £48.00You save £12.00 (20%) Add to basket

Published

16 Jan 2019

Page count

176 pages

Series

New Horizons in Criminology

ISBN

978-1529203905

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£21.99 £17.59You save £4.40 (20%)Buy from Amazon.co.uk

Published

16 Jan 2019

Page count

176 pages

Series

New Horizons in Criminology

ISBN

978-1529203875

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£21.99 £17.59You save £4.40 (20%) Add to basket
A Criminology of Moral Order

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Moral order is disturbed by criminal events. However, in a secularized and networked society a common moral ground is increasingly hard to find.

People feel confused about the bigger issues of our time such as crime, anti-social behaviour, Islamist radicalism, sexual harassment and populism. Traditionally, issues around morality have been neglected by criminologists.

Through theory, case studies and discussion, this book sheds a new and topical light on these concerns. Using the moral perspective, Boutellier bridges the gap between people’s emotional opinions on crime, and criminologists' rationalized answers to questions of crime and security.

“Over the past 35 years Hans Boutellier has become a leading diagnostician of Dutch society and beyond. His moral approach to crime is unique as well as provocative, and has transformed him into a new Durkheim for our liquid modern times. A Criminology of Moral Order will be the book that introduces his work to a truly global readership.” Tom Daems, Leuven Institute of Criminology

Prof. Hans Boutellier is a leading social scientist in the Netherlands and Professor in Security, Safety and Resilience at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. His previous publications include “The Secular Experiment” (2015); “The Improvising Society” (2011); “The Safety Utopia” (2002); and “Crime and Morality” (1993)

Introduction: A conceptual exploration of moral space

Part I: Complexity without direction

Social order in a network society

The radical secularization of moral space

Part II: Security politics

Criminal law as a moral stronghold

Securitization in a safe new world

Part III: Sex and identity

Sexual offences and mutual consent

Diversity, radicalization and populism

Conclusion: Emerging morality