Publishing with a purpose

A Criminology of War?

By Ross McGarry and Sandra Walklate

Published

3 Jul 2019

Page count

176 pages

Series

New Horizons in Criminology

ISBN

978-1529202595

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£60.00 £48.00You save £12.00 (20%) Add to basket

Published

3 Jul 2019

Page count

176 pages

Series

New Horizons in Criminology

ISBN

978-1529202601

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£21.99 £17.59You save £4.40 (20%)Buy from Amazon.co.uk

Published

3 Jul 2019

Page count

176 pages

Series

New Horizons in Criminology

ISBN

978-1529202625

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£21.99 £17.59You save £4.40 (20%) Add to basket
A Criminology of War?

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With the academic study of ‘war’ gaining renewed popularity within criminology in recent years, this book illustrates the long-standing engagement with this social phenomenon within the discipline.

Foregrounding established criminological work addressing war and connecting it to a wide range of extant sociological literature, the authors present and further develop theoretical and conceptual ways of thinking critically about war. While providing an implicit critique of mainstream criminology the authors seek to question whether a ‘criminology of war’ is possible, and if so, how this seemingly ‘new horizon’ of the discipline might be usefully informed by sociology.

''Solidly grounded in inter- and intra-disciplinary scholarship, McGarry and Walklate provide a sophisticated and critical analysis of complex connections between war and criminology. While bringing the study of war closer to the centre of modern criminological enterprise, this book will attract serious attention far beyond it'.'' Ali Wardak, University of South Wales

Ross McGarry is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology at the University of Liverpool.

Sandra Walklate is Eleanor Rathbone Chair of Sociology at the University of Liverpool and conjoint Chair of Criminology at Monash University.

Introduction: Can there be a “criminology of war”?;

Theorising "war" within sociology and criminology;

The war on terrorism: criminology’s “third war”;

The “forgotten criminology of genocide”;

From nuclear to “degenerate” war;

The “dialectics of war” in criminology;

Criminology’s “fourth war”? Gendering war and its violence(s);

Conclusion: Beyond a “new” wars paradigm: bringing the periphery into view.