Policy Press

HIV, Gender and the Politics of Medicine

Embodied Democracy in the Global South

By Elizabeth Mills

Published

Apr 29, 2024

Page count

256 pages

ISBN

978-1529221916

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press

Published

Apr 29, 2024

Page count

256 pages

ISBN

978-1529221954

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press

Published

Apr 29, 2024

Page count

256 pages

ISBN

978-1529221954

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
HIV, Gender and the Politics of Medicine

Drawing on long-term ethnographic studies, this book centres on women who live with HIV in South Africa, Brazil and India and who have fought, through transnational activist networks, to access essential medicines through their country’s public health system.

The book traces the path of the individual to the national and transnational to demonstrate the political and embodied ramifications of policies governing AIDs medicine on individual lives. Founded on two decades of ethnographic research, including participant observation, participatory photography and film and journey mapping, the book shows the ways in which HIV-positive women have acted on national and global policies in their efforts to access necessary medication and treatments. By tracing this important struggle, the book reveals the lessons that were learned by the activists and policy makers who were engaged in shaping these vital policies.

“Embodied Democracy is a tour de force in medical anthropology. Mills successfully moves from local communities of South Africa and Brazil to the pharmaceutical industries in India and back again. The ethnographic detail in this book is exquisite. A must read.” - Pamela Downe, University of Saskatchewan, Canada

Elizabeth Mills is Senior Lecturer in International Development at the University of Sussex.

1. Introduction

2. Concepts, Contexts and Methods

3. Gender, Health and Embodiment

4. New Generation Struggles

5. Health Citizenship

6. Therapeutic Governance

7. Global Health Governance

Conclusion