Policy Press

Publishing with a Purpose

Home-Land: Romanian Roma, domestic spaces and the state

Published

1 Jan 2019

Page count

216 pages

Series

Global migration and social change

ISBN

978-1529201925

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£75.00 £60.00You save £15.00 (20%) Pre-order

Published

1 Jan 2019

Page count

216 pages

Series

Global migration and social change

ISBN

978-1529201956

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£26.99 £21.59You save £5.40 (20%)

Published

1 Jan 2019

Page count

216 pages

Series

Global migration and social change

ISBN

978-1529201949

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£26.99 £21.59You save £5.40 (20%)
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    In contemporary society, passport checks at nation-state borders are accepted. But what if these checks were happening in our own home? This book is the first intimate ethnography of these governing encounters in the home space between Romanian Roma migrants and local frontline workers.

    Focusing on how the nation-state is reproduced within the home, the book considers what it is like to have your legal status, your right to ‘belong’, judged from your everyday domestic life. In essence this book is about the divide between state and family, home-land and home and what it means for the new rules of citizenship.

    Rachel Humphris is a Lecturer and Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in the School of Social Policy at the University of Birmingham as well as a Research Affiliate at the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology at the Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS) at the University of Oxford. Previously she was visiting doctoral fellow at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity (MPI MMG) in Gottingen. She is also the UK Coordinator for the European Website on Integration.

    Preface;

    Introduction: Governing, migration, and citizenship;

    Part 1: Situating encounters: Histories and identities;

    Chapter 1: Policies, legal measures and Brexit;

    Chapter 2: Luton, extremism and conviviality;

    Chapter 3: Becoming Romanian Roma in the UK;

    Chapter 4: Becoming a ‘home-level’ bureaucrat;

    Part 2: Borders of the migrant home;

    Chapter 5: Homemade legal status;

    Chapter 6: Home as a space of exclusion;

    Part 3: The migrant home as border zone;

    Conclusion: Home encounters and shifting spaces of state making;

    Appendix: Situating home encounters.