Policy Press

Publishing with Purpose

Philosophy Behind Bars

Growth and Development in Prison

By Kirstine Szifris

Published

Jul 19, 2021

Page count

224 pages

ISBN

978-1529205558

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press

Published

Jul 19, 2021

Page count

224 pages

ISBN

978-1529205541

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press

Published

Jul 19, 2021

Page count

224 pages

ISBN

978-1529205589

Dimensions

Imprint

Bristol University Press
GBP 22.99 GBP 18.39You save GBP 4.60 (20%)
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    Philosophy Behind Bars

    Male prisons can be dangerous places, with a climate of distrust underpinned by a divided atmosphere and survival is imperative for both physical and psychological wellbeing. Can long-term prisoners be given the space to reflect, and grow ?

    This ground-breaking study found that engaging prisoners in philosophy education enabled them to think about some of the ‘big’ questions in life and as a result to see themselves and others differently.

    Using the prisoners’ own words, Szifris shows the importance of this type of education for growth and development. She demonstrates how the philosophical dialogue led to a form of community which provided a space for self-reflection, pro-social interaction and communal exploration of ideas, which could have long-term positive consequences.

    Kirstine Szifris is Senior Research Associate at the Policy Evaluation and Research Unit, Manchester Metropolitan University. Before moving into academia, she worked as a teacher hosting philosophy clubs during lunchtimes and after school clubs. She has a PhD from Cambridge University which takes a humanistic approach in placing the prisoner’s voice at the heart of the research.

    Introduction;

    Theseus’s Ship Philosophy, Identity and the role of dialogue;

    Plato’s republic Survival in the prison context;

    Kant and Compassion Alternative prison environments: The role of behaviour;

    Bentham, Mill and Utilitarianism Prison education and the hierarchy of good in rehabilitation;

    Descartes and Cogito Ergo Sum The importance of self-reflection and growth in the prison environment;

    Hume and Arendt The relevance of context to constructions of identity;

    Socrates The good life, developing trust and community;

    Identity, the Ego trick and the internal narrative;

    The Stoics Survival vs growth – walking the tightrope;

    Achieving philosophical conversation through Art, human rights and Free Speech: Positive, philosophical conversation;

    Epilogue: What happened next;

    A final word.