Robots and Immigrants

Who Is Stealing Jobs?

By Kostas Maronitis and Denny Pencheva

Published

Sep 29, 2022

Page count

176 pages

ISBN

978-1529212716

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press

Published

Sep 29, 2022

Page count

176 pages

ISBN

978-1529212730

Dimensions

Imprint

Bristol University Press
Robots and Immigrants

Who steals jobs? Who owns jobs?

Focusing on the competitive labour market, this book scrutinizes the narratives created around immigration and automation. The authors explore how the advances in AI and demands for constant flow of immigrant workers eradicate political and working rights, fuelling fears over job theft and ownership.

Shedding light on the multiple ways in which employment is used as an instrument of neoliberal governance, this revealing book sparks new debate on the role of automation and migration policies. It is an invaluable resource for academics and practitioners working in the areas of immigration and labour, capitalism and social exclusion, and economic models and political governance.

“Theoretically outstanding and empirically informed, Maronitis and Pencheva present us with a magisterial account of the societal and moral concerns of restrictive immigration regimes with rapid rescaling of work with robots, AI and algorithm solutions. Immigrants belabour in dirty, dangerous and demeaning conditions that automation solution alleviates, yet they also replace (the need for) migrant workers.” Roxana Barbulescu, University of Leeds

Kostas Maronitis is Senior Lecturer in Politics and International Relations at Leeds Trinity University.

Denny Pencheva is Lecturer in European Politics and Public Policy at University College London.

1. Introduction: Stealing Jobs

2. The Re-Birth of Homo Oeconomicus: Self and Other, Immigrants and Robot

3. “A Necessary Evil”: Progress Through Normalising Inequalities and Competition

4. I Robot

5. The Men Machines: Migrants as Robots

6. Expensive Robots vs Cheap Migrants

7. Nostalgia, Futurism and the Re-emergence of the Common