Publishing with a purpose

The Criminology of Boxing, Violence and Desistance

By Deborah Jump

Published

1 Apr 2020

Page count

200 pages

ISBN

978-1529203240

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£75.00 £60.00You save £15.00 (20%) Pre-order

Published

1 Apr 2020

Page count

200 pages

ISBN

978-1529203288

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£26.99 £21.59You save £5.40 (20%)
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  • The Criminology of Boxing, Violence and Desistance

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    Can the boxing gym be recognised as an effective space for supporting desistance?

    Exploring the psychosocial manifestations of boxing, this enlightening study reviews conflicting evidence to determine boxing’s place in the criminal justice system.

    Drawing upon the empirical insights, with case studies of participants’ backgrounds and their motivations for taking up the sport, Jump measures the value of the discipline, as well as the respect and fraternity that some claim boxing provides for young men. This is a perceptive addition to the debate about sport’s role in criminal desistance that delves deep into themes of masculinity and violence.

    ''Deborah Jump presents unique insights that challenge previous thinking on the transformational potential of boxing for violent men. This is a first-rate book; a must-read for anyone interested in life-course criminology, gender, sport and criminal desistance.'' Ross Deuchar, University of the West of Scotland

    ''This book has some great stories from the inside. Jump offers a detailed critique and makes the case for changing masculinities and transformations in the dynamic relationship between boxing and criminal behaviour.'' Kath Woodward, The Open University

    Deborah Jump is Senior Lecturer in Criminology at the Manchester Metropolitan University. She has over fifteen years’ experience of working in youth justice as both a practitioner and service manager. She is the Head of Youth Justice at the Manchester Centre for Youth Studies and was previously the recipient of a Winston Churchill Memorial Fund evaluating the impact of sporting programmes on communities in the USA.

    Introduction

    Why Boxing?

    The Appeal and Desistance Promoting Potential of Boxing

    The Case of Frank: Respect, Embodiment and the Appeal of the Boxing Gym

    The Case of Eric: Self-Violence, Boxing and the Damaged Emasculated Body

    The Case of Simon: Shame, Violence, and Reputation

    The Appeal of the Boxing Gym

    The Desistance Promoting Potential of Boxing

    Discussion

    Conclusion