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Work, Labour and Cleaning

The Social Contexts of Outsourcing Housework

Published

24 Jul 2019

Page count

292 pages

Series

Gender and Sociology

ISBN

978-1529201468

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£75.00 £37.50You save £37.50 (50%) Pre-order

Published

24 Jul 2019

Page count

292 pages

Series

Gender and Sociology

ISBN

978-1529201482

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£26.99 £13.49You save £13.50 (50%)
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    The outsourcing of domestic work in the UK has been steadily rising since the 1970s, but there has been little research into White British women who work as independent providers of cleaning services.

    Work, Labour and Cleaning is a cross-cultural analysis based on new research into two particular social contexts, one in the UK and one in India. It argues that outsourced domestic cleaning can be undertaken either as work (using mental and manual skills) or as labour (usually defined as unskilled, 'natural' women’s work) depending on the social context and working conditions in which it occurs. The book challenges feminist dogma and popular myths about housework.

    "Brilliant and thought-provoking, this much-needed book takes up the challenge to compare two realities treated so far as 'worlds apart'.'' Sabrina Marchetti, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice

    Lotika Singha received her doctorate in women’s studies from the University of York. Her research interests centre on social inequalities in everyday life and cross-cultural theories across various population groups.

    Introduction

    Conceptualising Paid Domestic Work

    Behind the Words: Introducing the Research Project and Respondents

    Nuances in the Politics of Demand for Outsourced Housecleaning

    The Imperfect Contours of Outsourced Domestic Cleaning as Dirty Work

    Domestic Cleaning: Work or Labour

    Meanings of Domestic Cleaning as Work and Labour

    The Occupational Relations of Domestic Cleaning as Work and Labour

    Concluding the Book, Continuing the Journey

    Appendices