Policy Press

Publishing with Purpose

Advancing Children’s Rights in Detention

A Model for International Reform

By Ursula Kilkelly and Pat Bergin

Published

Nov 1, 2021

Page count

176 pages

ISBN

978-1529213218

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press

Published

Nov 1, 2021

Page count

176 pages

ISBN

978-1529213232

Dimensions

Imprint

Bristol University Press
GBP 24.99 GBP 19.99You save GBP 5.00 (20%)
  • Coming soon

  • Click to order from North America, Canada and South America

    The UN Global Study on Children Deprived of Liberty detailed many children’s poor experiences in detention, highlighting the urgent need for reform.

    Applying a child-centred model of detention that fulfils the rights of the child under the five themes of Provision, Protection, Participation, Preparation and Partnership, this original book illustrates how reform can happen. Drawing on Ireland’s experience of transforming law, policy and practice and combining theory with real-life experiences, this compelling book demonstrates how children’s rights can be implemented in detention.

    This important case study of reform presents a powerful argument for a progressive, rights-based approach to child detention. Worthy of international application, the book shares practical insights into how theory can be translated into practice.

    Ursula Kilkelly is Professor of law in the School of Law at University College Cork. She is chairperson of the Board of Management, Oberstown Children Detention Campus.

    Pat Bergin was the first Director of Oberstown Children Detention Campus. He is now Head of Service at the National Forensic Mental Health Service.

    Introduction

    Part 1 ~ Global Issues in Youth Detention

    Children’s Rights in Youth Detention

    Detention as an International Concern

    Part 2 ~ Transforming Detention in Ireland

    Introducing Youth Justice in Ireland

    Detention in Ireland

    Oberstown: The Model

    Staff, Standards, Communication and Accountability

    Part 3 ~ Effecting Change: The Learning

    Effecting Change

    External Influences

    Conclusion