Policy Press

Decolonisation and Legal Knowledge

Reflections on Power and Possibility

By Folúkẹ́ Adébísí

Published

Apr 9, 2024

Page count

204 pages

ISBN

978-1529219388

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press

Published

Mar 15, 2023

Page count

204 pages

ISBN

978-1529219371

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press

Published

Mar 15, 2023

Page count

204 pages

ISBN

978-1529219395

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press

Published

Mar 15, 2023

Page count

204 pages

ISBN

978-1529219395

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press
Decolonisation and Legal Knowledge

The law is heavily implicated in creating, maintaining, and reproducing racialised hierarchies which bring about and preserve acute global disparities and injustices. This essential book provides an examination of the meanings of decolonisation and explores how this examination can inform teaching, researching, and practising of law.

It explores the ways in which the foundations of law are entangled in colonial thought and in its [re]production of ideas of commodification of bodies and space-time. Thus, it is an exploration of the ways in which we can use theories and praxes of decolonisation to produce legal knowledge for flourishing futures.

“A thought-provoking account of what decolonising legal knowledge and legal education requires. A must-read for anyone who takes anti-racism in legal education seriously.” Bharat Malkani, Cardiff University

"Adebisi brings her singular gift of critical rigour and passion to bear on the understudied topic of decolonising legal knowledge and education. Her arguments attest to her restless moral vision." Joel Modiri, University of Pretoria

“A compelling and beautifully written journey tracing the coloniality of legal knowledge, calling us to forge ways of researching, teaching and ‘doing’ law that places the ethical imperative for a pluriversal justice at its core.” Suhraiya Jivraj, University of Kent

“A legal research and education book like no other! Immersing readers in interdisciplinary postcolonial theories and strategies, Adébísí powerfully dissects the colonial university and then imaginatively constructs an abundantly inclusive space to engage a new idea of law.” Patricia Tuitt, independent legal academic

Folúkẹ́ Adébísí is Associate Professor at the University of Bristol.

Introduction: Setting the Scene of the Law School and the Discipline

1. Theories of Decolonisation or to Break All the Tables and Create the World Necessary for Us All to Survive

2. What Have You Done, Where Have You Been, Euro-Modern Legal Academe? Uncovering the Bones of Law’s Colonial Ontology

3. Defining the Law’s Subject I: (Un)Making the Wretched of the Earth

4. Defining the Law’s Subject II: Law and Creating the Sacrifice Zones of Colonialism

5. Defining the Law’s Subject III: Law, Time, and Colonialism’s Slow Violence

6. The Law School: Colonial Ground Zero – A Colonial Convergence in the Human and Space–Time

Conclusion: Another University Is Necessary to Take Us towards Pluriversal Worlds