Policy Press

Publishing with a purpose

Queering Criminology in Theory and Praxis

Reimagining Justice in the Criminal Legal System and Beyond

Edited by Carrie Buist and Lindsay Kahle Semprevivo

Published

Mar 29, 2022

Page count

288 pages

ISBN

978-1529210699

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press

Published

Mar 29, 2022

Page count

288 pages

ISBN

978-1529210729

Dimensions

Imprint

Bristol University Press
Queering Criminology in Theory and Praxis

This accessible book introduces the key concepts and theoretical developments of queer criminology and explains what they mean for modern criminal justice frameworks and practitioners.

The book sets out experiences of the LGBTQ+ population as victims, offenders and professionals in legal systems in the US and internationally and explores what they mean for elements of those systems including police, courts, corrections and victims’ services. It is both a useful reference point for academics, students and professionals, and a guide to how queer criminology can be theoretically applied and practically implemented in the worlds of policing, courts, corrections, and victims' services.

“'Queering Criminology' is an essential resource for those looking to queer the discipline through their research, their studies or their teaching.” Brian Frederick, University of Portsmouth

Carrie L. Buist is Associate Professor at the School of Criminal Justice, Grand Valley State University.

Lindsay L. Kahle is Teaching Assistant Professor of Criminology at West Virginia University.

Introduction: Towards Freedom, Empowerment, and Agency: An Introduction to Queering Criminology in Theory and Praxis: Reimaging Justice in the Criminal Legal System and Beyond – Carrie L. Buist and Lindsay Kahle Semprevivo

1. Gender- and Sexuality-Based Violence Among LGBTQ People: An Empirical Test of Norm-Centered Stigma Theory – Meredith G.F. Worthen

2. Queer Pathways – Michael K. Winters

3. Queer Criminology and the Destabilization of Child Sexual Abuse – Dave McDonald

4. Queer(y)ing the Experiences of LGBTQ Workers in Criminal Processing Systems – Angela Dwyer and Roddrick A. Colvin

5. ‘PREA Is a Joke’: A Case Study of How Trans PREA Standards Are(n’t) Enforced – April Carrillo

6. Queerly Navigating the System: Trans* Experiences Under State Surveillance – Rayna E. Momen

7. Sex-Gender Defining Laws, Birth Certificates, and Identity – Jon Rosenstadt

8. Effects of Intimate Partner Violence in the LGBTQ Community: A. Systematic Review – Illandra Denysschen and Rosalind Evans

9. Health Covariates of Intimate Partner Violence in a National Transgender Sample – Victoria Kurdyla, Adam M. Messinger, and Xavier L. Guadalupe-Diaz

10. Serving Transgender, Gender Nonconforming, and Intersex Youth in Alameda County’s Juvenile Hall – Alexandria Garcia, Naseem Badiey, Laura Agnich Chavez, and Wendy Still

11. Liberating Black Youth Across the Gender Spectrum Through the Deconstruction of the White Femininity/Black Masculinity Duality – Angela Irvine-Baker, Aisha Canfield, and Carolyn Reyes

12. ‘I Thought They Were Supposed to Be on My Side’: What Jane Doe’s Experience Teaches Us About Institutional Harm Against Trans Youth – Vanessa R. Panfil and Aimee Wodda

13. The Role of Adolescent Friendship Networks in Queer Youth’s Delinquency – Nayan G. Ramirez

14. ‘At the Very Least’: Politics and Praxis of Bail Fund Organizers and the Potential for Queer Liberation – Luca Suede Connolly and Rose M. Buckelew

15. A Conspiracy – Lucilla R. Harrell and S. Page Dukes

16. LGBTQ+ Homelessness: Resource Obtainment and Issues With Shelters – Trye Mica Price and Tusty ten Bensel

17. The Color of Queer Theory in Social Work and Criminology Practice: A World Without Empathy – Rebecca S. Katz

18. Camouflaged: Tackling the Invisibility of LGBTQ+ Veterans When Accessing Care – Shanna N. Felix and Chrystina Y. Hoffman

19. Barriers to Reporting, Barriers to Services: Challenges for Transgender Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Victimization – Danielle C. Slakoff and Jaclyn A. Siegel

Conclusion: What Does It Mean to Do Justice? Current and Future Directions in Queer Criminological Research and Practice – Lindsay Kahle Semprevivo and Carrie L. Buist