Policy Press

Publishing with Purpose

The Criminalisation of Social Policy in Neoliberal Societies

By Elizabeth Kiely and Katharina Swirak

Published

Nov 12, 2021

Page count

176 pages

ISBN

978-1529202960

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press

Published

Nov 12, 2021

Page count

176 pages

ISBN

978-1529202977

Dimensions

Imprint

Bristol University Press
The Criminalisation of Social Policy in Neoliberal Societies

From anti-immigration agendas which criminalise vulnerable populations, to the punishment of the poor and the governance of parenting, this timely book explores how diverse fields of social policy intersect more deeply than ever with crime control and in so doing, deploy troubling strategies.

The international context of this book is complemented by the inclusion of specific policy examples across the themes of work and welfare; borders and migration; family policy; homelessness and reintegration of justice-involved persons.

This book incites the reader to consider how we can reclaim the best of the ‘social’ in social policy for the twenty-first century.

"This book brings proportionate and rigorous analysis to the question. It is certainly critical of compounding disqualifications and exclusions of a wider range of people. Its conclusions are not necessarily pessimistic, is lucid and clear without oversimplifying the debate." Mary Corcoran, Keele University

Elizabeth Kiely is Senior Lecturer in Social Policy in the School of Applied Social Studies at University College Cork, Ireland.

Katharina Swirak is Lecturer in the Department of Sociology and Criminology at University College Cork, Ireland.

Introduction

Introducing the ‘Criminalisation of Social Policy’ and an Overview of Relevant Scholarship

Disciplining the Poor: Welfare Conditionality and Labour Market Activation

Criminalising Borders, Migration and Mobility

Criminalising Homelessness and Poverty Through Urban Policy

Policing Parenting, ‘Family Support’ and the Discipline and Punishment of Poor Families

Criminalising Justice-Involved Persons Through Rehabilitation and Reintegration Policies

Re-Envisioning Alternative Futures