Policy Press

Publishing with Purpose

Welfare and Punishment

From Thatcherism to Austerity

By Ian Cummins

Published

17 Feb 2021

Page count

176 pages

ISBN

978-1529203899

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press

Published

17 Feb 2021

Page count

176 pages

ISBN

978-1529203882

Dimensions

Imprint

Bristol University Press
£26.99 £21.59You save £5.40 (20%)
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    Welfare and Punishment

    In this enlightening study, Ian Cummins traces changing attitudes to penal and welfare systems.

    From Margaret Thatcher’s first cabinet to austerity politics via New Labour, the book reveals the ideological shifts that have led successive governments to reinforce their penal powers. It shows how ‘tough on crime’ messages have spread to other areas of social policy, too, fostering the neoliberal political economy, encouraging hostile approaches to the social state, and creating stigma for those living in poverty.

    This is an important addition to the debate around the complex and inter-connected issues of welfare and punishment.

    "Through strong analysis and rich detail, this book is a critical invitation to readers to trace the intersection of politics and punishments, and to understand punishments in a broader context of political and public policy discourse.” Paul Taylor, University of Chester

    “I always look forward reading the work of Ian Cummins and here he provides an authoritative, accessible account of the evolution of toxic ‘welfare’ politics.” Paul Michael Garrett, NUI Galway, Republic of Ireland

    Ian Cummins is Senior Lecturer in the School of Health and Society at Salford University.

    Introduction

    Thatcherism and its Legacy

    Welfare and Punishment in a ‘Stark Utopia’ (1979– 2015)

    Contemporary Narratives of Mass Incarceration

    Exploring the Punitive Turn

    The Third Way in Welfare and Penal Policy

    New Labour, New Realism?

    Austerity and the Big Society

    Conclusion: Citizenship and the Centaur State