Policy Press

Publishing with Purpose

Transnational Criminology

Trafficking and Global Criminal Markets

By Simon Mackenzie

Published

6 Oct 2020

Page count

210 pages

Series

New Horizons in Criminology

ISBN

978-1529203783

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Bristol University Press

Published

6 Oct 2020

Page count

210 pages

Series

New Horizons in Criminology

ISBN

978-1529203844

Dimensions

Imprint

Bristol University Press
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    Transnational Criminology

    This pioneering study looks across key trafficking crimes to develop a social theory of transnational criminal markets. These include human trafficking, drug dealing, and black markets in wildlife, diamonds, guns and antiquities,

    The author offers an in-depth analysis of structural similarities and differences within illicit trade networks, and explores the economic underpinnings which drive global trafficking.

    Revealing how traffickers think of their illegal enterprises as ‘just business’, he draws broader lessons for the ways forward in understanding criminality in this emerging field.

    "Provides a theory of transnational illicit markets that convincingly links local practices that are as banal as they are evil with the globalization of indifference that underpins them.” James Sheptycki, York University, Toronto, Canada

    "After reading this thoroughly researched book, one finds it hard to claim that developed countries are victimized by criminality originating in developing ones. The networks of interdependency involving both suggest otherwise." Vincenzo Ruggiero, Middlesex University, London

    Simon Mackenzie is Professor of Criminology and Head of the School of Social and Cultural Studies at Victoria University of Wellington. Concurrently he is Professor of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of Glasgow.

    Introduction: Trafficking as Transnational Crime

    Drug Trafficking

    Human Trafficking

    Wildlife Trafficking

    Diamond Trafficking

    Arms Trafficking

    Antiquities Trafficking

    Conclusion: A Social Theory of Transnational Criminal Markets