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18 Jan 2018

Choice Outstanding Academic Title Winner

Congratulations to Shirley Hill, and her book Inequality and African-American Health, for being named an Outstanding Academic Title by Choice! Keep reading
Choice Outstanding Academic Title Winner

15 Jan 2018

Why does public sexual harassment matter?

The announcement today that MPs are launching an inquiry into the public sexual harassment of women and girls is a welcome recognition that finally these experiences matter. Fiona Vera-Gray, author of The Right Amount of Panic, looks at how safety and freedom work together in women’s lives. Read more on our blog
Why does public sexual harassment matter?

15 Dec 2017

The centrality of poverty

By Glen Bramley, co-editor of Poverty and Social Exclusion in the UK Vol. 2. Originally published by Poverty and Social Exclusion on December 8th 2017. Read more on our blog
The centrality of poverty

14 Dec 2017

The relationship between work & health in India

Martin Hyde, co-editor of Work and health in India, discusses the relationship between work and health in a country with one of the fastest growing economies in the world and with a labour force of nearly half a billion people. Read more on our blog
The relationship between work & health in India

12 Dec 2017

Congratulations Alison Shaw!

Bristol University Press and Policy Press are delighted to announce the inclusion of its CEO, Alison Shaw in the top 100 most influential people in the book trade 2017. Keep reading
Congratulations Alison Shaw!

8 Dec 2017

Policy Press journals accepted onto the Emerging Sources Citation Index

Policy Press is delighted to announce that the following journals have been accepted onto the Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI): Keep reading
Policy Press journals accepted onto the Emerging Sources Citation Index

7 Dec 2017

Siblings with and without disabilities think differently to each other about the comparison...

This blog piece is based on the following article: Meltzer, A. (2017) Comparative life experiences: Young adult siblings with and without disabilities’ different understandings of their respective life experiences during young adulthood. Families, Relationships and Societies, early view. Read more on our blog
Siblings with and without disabilities think differently to each other about the comparison...

4 Dec 2017

How to start dismantling white privilege in higher education

Racism is still alive and well in US and UK academia, writes Kalwant Bhopal, author of White privilege. She argues that to dismantle it, there is a need for radical action from universities, which must start by acknowledging the existence of institutional racism and white privilege. Read more on our blog
How to start dismantling white privilege in higher education

30 Nov 2017

The extent of poverty

By Gill Main, co-editor, with Esther Dermott, of the first volume of Poverty and Social Exclusion in the UK and University Academic Fellow at the University of Leeds. Originally published by Poverty and Social Exclusion on November 29th 2017. Read more on our blog
The extent of poverty

24 Nov 2017

Carers Rights Day: International Perspectives

Every year Carers UK holds Carers Rights Day to help carers find out about their rights and how to access help and support. There is overwhelming evidence that many family carers often care for many years without knowing what support they are entitled to. However, carers’ rights need to be embedded within wider health, social, and employment policies, as two articles published in the journal this year reveal. Read more on our blog
Carers Rights Day: International Perspectives

22 Nov 2017

Why the left loses: Explaining the decline of centre-left parties

Are centre-left parties across Europe facing a future of decline? Drawing on a new book, Rob Manwaring and Paul Kennedy argue that an essential element in any robust democracy is an effective centre-left. However, centre-left parties now face a number of major challenges, from the rise of new parties to the erosion of their traditional support bases, and only by addressing these challenges can their decline be halted. Read more on our blog
Why the left loses: Explaining the decline of centre-left parties

17 Nov 2017

Beyond the Backstreet – Fighting for Abortion Rights 50 Years on

Judith Orr, author of Abortion wars, recently spoke at a one-day event hosted by Abortion Rights to celebrate the 50th birthday of the 1967 Abortion Act. Keep reading
Beyond the Backstreet – Fighting for Abortion Rights 50 Years on

17 Nov 2017

What's gone wrong with welfare reform?

Sam Royston launched his new book Broken benefits with a roundtable discussion in parliament discussing the flaws of social security and the changes needed to build a better system for the future. Keep reading
What's gone wrong with welfare reform?

15 Nov 2017

The Tax Credits system needs fixing: addressing Universal Credit is not enough

Sam Royston, author of Broken benefits, argues that the government must reform the flawed Tax Credits system before they can even begin to improve Universal Credit. Read more on our blog
The Tax Credits system needs fixing: addressing Universal Credit is not enough

8 Nov 2017

Europe’s largest ghetto: squalor and violence in the shadows of Madrid

Welcome to Valdemingómez. Just 12km from Madrid, political neglect, spatial exclusion and social policy stagnation have created a lawless landscape of drugs and violence. Squalor and hopelessness reduce chances of a way out. Read more on our blog
Europe’s largest ghetto: squalor and violence in the shadows of Madrid

6 Nov 2017

Is the new impact agenda the excuse you’ve been waiting for...?

Sharon Wright and Peter Dwyer, researching the impacts of Universal Credit since 2013 as part of the collaborative ESRC Welfare Conditionality project, reflect on their recent experience of contributing to the Universal Credit debate, to argue that impact activities can be most meaningful if they are aimed at making a difference that really matters. Read more on our blog
Is the new impact agenda the excuse you’ve been waiting for...?

2 Nov 2017

Carl Milofsky appointed Co-Editor of Voluntary Sector Review

We are delighted to announce that Professor Carl Milofsky will be joining the editorial team of Voluntary Sector Review (VSR) as Co-Editor from January 2018. Keep reading
Carl Milofsky appointed Co-Editor of Voluntary Sector Review

24 Oct 2017

#MeToo and the underlying contradictions of patriarchy

By Emma Williamson, Co-Editor of the Journal of Gender-Based Violence Recent weeks have seen a deluge of allegations against movie mogul Harvey Weinstein, with the media scrambling to print stories from A-List celebrities: allegations, what they knew (or didn’t), or whether Harvey Weinstein’s behaviour is the tip of a toxic iceberg. Read more on our blog
#MeToo and the underlying contradictions of patriarchy

20 Oct 2017

Am I a patient?

Alan Cribb unravels the transition from an epidemiological approach to a philosophical approach to healthcare he discusses in his new book – Healthcare in transition – by examining how his identification, or not, as a patient impacts on his research. Read more on our blog
Am I a patient?

19 Oct 2017

Editor in Chief of Journal of Gender-Based Violence becomes Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences

Professor Marianne Hester OBE, Chair in Gender, Violence and International Policy at the University of Bristol and Editor in Chief of the Journal of Gender-Based Violence has been awarded the title of Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences. Keep reading
Editor in Chief of Journal of Gender-Based Violence becomes Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences